Does your Wave2 AP need NBase-T?

Cisco recently launched the 2800 and 3800 series 802.11ac wave-2 access points. The 3800 Datasheet quotes a theoretical maximum throughput of 5.2Gbps when operating in Dual 5GHz radio mode (2 x 2.6Gbps). If you ran two cables to your AP you could use the second ethernet port to create a 2 x 1Gbps LAG. However there is still some debate about whether 2Gbps of throughput is sufficient for a single-radio Wave2 AP.

Some companies may not be willing to invest the time and expense to swap out their copper for fiber or run yet more copper to their APs. The NBase-T standard 802.3bz provides an alternative approach, promising speeds of 2.5Gbps or 5Gbps over Cat5e cabling over 100 Meter runs.

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Redistribution of named and tagged static routes

Redistribute named and Tagged Static routesI always name my IOS static routes as a best practise. However I hit a syntax issue last week when I tried to combine the named static with a tag, then redistributing that tagged static route into OSPF. If you have issues redistributing a ‘named and tagged static’ then this may be the post for you.

The simplified config snippet below is configured on SW1 (cisco 3750X). This config will match all static routes tagged with ‘200’ and redistribute them into OSPF. I could have avoided this whole issue if I used a prefix list to match the routes, but I think tag-and-match is a more efficient and less-error prone approach.

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Link Utilisation Varies By Packet Size

I said to a colleague recently, “you can’t get 100% link utilisation on an Ethernet link”. When I tried to explain myself I wished I could link to a simple blog post with a nice graph. So here’s a quick blog post with a nice graph. I have talked a little about link speed in a previous post, but I wanted expand on this and add a quick graph to back up the argument.

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Is CPU or ASIC responsible for forwarding?

I received the question below from reader Ned as a comment on my 24-port ASIC post and thought that the discussion was worth a post of it’s own.

…Would you be able to speak a bit about the actual physical path or packet flow a packet takes inside the switch itself and how does the hardware forwarding take place within the switch and asic. When does packet get sent to the Asic. Is it happen on ingress or on egress? When does packet get analyzed by CPU or control plane. If the CPU never sees the actual packet how does asic know where to forward the packet and does that mean the packets stay within asic itself and is that what is meant to be hardware forwarding. Is Asic = dataplane. Tx

I like this question because it captures a lot of my early assumptions and concerns about data and control plane separation. My response assumes a single-stage modern switch-on-chip ASIC without backplane or fabric.  Continue reading

A quiz on OSPF

Hi All,

I’m experimenting with a new quiz engine and thought I’d write an OSPF Quiz.  It’s only 8 questions and covers some of the weird and wonderful OSPF topics I have covered in the past. You’ll find them pretty easy if you’re a regular reader, or just don’t get out that much (like me!).

I’d love it if you could have a go and give me some feedback.

http://thenetworksherpa.com/ospf-quiz/

Regards,

John Harrington.

OSPF – Setting MTU values for Cisco and Juniper

MTU mismatches are the primary reason an OSPF adjacency becomes stuck in the EXSTART state.  After hellos are exchanged and the routers become neighbors, each OSPF speaker advertises the IP MTU of it’s local interface in a Data Base Description (DBD) LSA.  If there is a mismatch you’ll probably just adjust the configuration to be identical on both ends of the link and be done. However, when you try to peer two OSPF routers with different network operating systems, things start to fall apart fairly quickly.

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